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Pembrokeshire Planning – Town Planning Specialist

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Pembrokeshire Planning ‘Classics’

Pembrokeshire Planning ‘Classics’

Posted by on Nov 15, 2012 in Blog, Pembrokeshire Planning |

Classic Pembrokeshire Planning responses You can have a holiday home in rural Pembrokeshire but not a family home because there is no bus service. A business has been operating for 42 years and the ageing owners, who are in their 70’s, want to retire and allow their daughter to take it over and live in a former cottage on the site – they were told sorry but due to your ill health the business isn’t viable anymore and anyway she can go and live in the nearest village (where house prices are 3.5 times the cost of renovating the farm cottage). A caravan has on a site for 40 years but suddenly the planners don’t like it and it has to go – the caravan is owned by a 75 yr old man and the consent is personal to him so once he stops using it or passes away it has to go anyway. The fenestration in a proposed new house was deemed to be incongruous with the rest of the street – the rest of the street comprised every conceivable type of window shape, material and size that could ever be imagined. We are not going to support that application for a wind turbine because the owner wants to make money out of it. Our policy promotes affordable homes in rural areas and the open countryside (where there are no buses, schools, shops, doctors, etc, etc) ‘I don’t like that design’ – ‘Why?’ (pause for thought) – ‘Because I don’t.’ ‘That (small) extension will spoil the whole character of the cottage’ – said whilst standing looking at a similar neighbouring cottage that had been extended 3 times and increased in size by 150%. Wind farm proposals submitted by larger companies appear to be profit motivated. To a developer – ‘Why should I support this proposal only to make you more money’. Planning Inspector to planner – ‘Could you point out where the Coast Path is in relation to the appeal site’ Planner straight away points to the east ( it was to the west) Objectors letter to a wind turbine ‘The noise will be even worse than his...

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Pembrokeshire Coast National Park Planning Policy Alert

Pembrokeshire Coast National Park Planning Policy Alert

Posted by on Oct 24, 2012 in Blog, National Park Planning |

Site accessibility is now being used by Pembrokeshire Coast National Park planning officers as a reason to refuse new development and outbuilding conversions. Policy 7 of the Local Development Plan (LDP) contains qualifying criteria which refers to ‘accessibility to the Centres identified in the hierarchy’.  This requirement has been interpreted as a site having to be within 1km of a named Centre identified in the LDP, or the site being more than 1km away from a centre but within 1km of a bus service (however, this is where more qualifying criteria come in!) or the site is within 1km of a bus route with 5 or more return journeys a day. However, if a site is within 1km of a bus route with less than 5 return journeys a day it is deemed appropriate for holiday letting or, incredibly, affordable housing. Further ‘concessions’ are made for affordable housing if an application involves a building of architectural or historic interest or is simply for affordable housing, in which case the site does not have to be accessible. What we are therefore now seeing is a policy presumption being pursued by planning officers against much needed open market housing in the Pembrokeshire National Park, in favour of holiday homes and, more amazingly, affordable homes in isolated locations. Surely the whole idea of affordable home provision is to build close to shops, services, schools, bus routes, doctors etc so that the occupants are not further disadvantaged by finding themselves in a totally isolated rural location. Yet another example of the way planners in Pembrokeshire are working against the economic and social well-being of the areas...

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